Archive | Gender RSS feed for this section

This Stinks….NOT Boys

11 Sep

***Update (9/13/12): I’m pleased to report that Nordstrom has removed the ‘Boys Stink’ sign from their Scottsdale store. Thank you to those of you who voiced your concerns, and thank you Nordstrom for listening! ***

Over the weekend I was passing through the Nordstrom Children’s Department, and I saw this:

Continue reading

Reflections From A Former Elementary School Teacher

28 Aug

It’s three weeks into this school year, and I’m settling into this new role as an elementary school parent. I have to say, being on this side of the classroom door has been a tremendous eye-opener. This time of year typically elicits nostalgic feelings for my days in the classroom, but now that I’m in the school environment on a daily basis, I am constantly reflecting on my time as a teacher.

image credit: MS Office Clip Art

Continue reading

How to create stronger gender stereotypes in 2 short weeks!

19 Jun

Caryl Rivers, one of the authors of “The Truth about Girls and Boys,” wrote a terrific post on BlogHer last week which received a good amount of buzz. Her article, “6 Ways You Can Avoid Gender Stereotypes of Your Kids,” highlighted practical strategies for parents backed by some solid research. The post dispelled myths about brain development and gender, encouraged parents to be mindful of their own expectations for their children’s interests and abilities, and promoted the importance of exposing children to a variety of experiences. These tactics tofight back against toxic stereotypes and help girls and boys discover all their talents so that they can follow their dreams wherever they may lead,” got me thinking about something else parents and teachers can do to combat gender stereotypes – we can minimize our use of gender labels and limit how often we use gender to organize groups.

Photo Credit: MS Office Images

In 2010, researchers at Penn State University wanted to see if purposefully making gender salient in preschool classrooms for two weeks would change kids’ attitudes about each other. Continue reading

The Cycle of Gender Segregation

16 May

A post I wrote in January – 10 Reasons Girls and Boys Should Play Together – was recently shared by Pigtail Pals Ballcap Buddies and revisited by many (which was a thrill). In the post I make the statement that boys and girls don’t spend a whole lot of time together, and I go on to list some reasons why they should. I revisited this post myself, realizing it begs the question – why are girls and boys not spending time together in the first place? Continue reading

May Book Salute: Cinderella Ate My Daughter

1 May

In case you missed it, April 22nd marked the beginning of the first annual National Princess Week. Inviting children across the country to “celebrate the sparkle and wonder of every princess,” the long and the short of it is that Disney and Target partnered up (with Julie Andrews as a spokesperson) to get folks to buy a bunch of stuff for girls. Regardless of how you feel about the princess craze (and I pass no judgment here), I think we can all pretty much agree that these beloved characters are hardly lacking the attention and admiration that would warrant a week dedicated to their appreciation. But alas, as the Oncler once said to the Lorax, “business is business and business must grow!”

Photo Credit: PeggyOrenstein.com

So in the wake of Princess Week, it seems fitting to devote this month’s book salute to Peggy Orenstein’s Cinderella Ate My Daughter. Continue reading

March Book Salute: Pink Brain, Blue Brain

6 Mar

While we’ve all been warned time and again to avoid judging a book by its cover, sometimes a book’s title can be equally misleading. When I first heard of Pink Brain, Blue Brain by Lise Eliot, I immediately thought it was a book discussing the idea that boys and girls are “hard-wired” from the start to be different. I was mistaken. Pink Brain, Blue Brain – How Small Differences Grow into Troublesome Gaps-and What We Can Do About It takes that theory to task. Supported by the authors own research in the field of neuroplasticity along with the critiques of many others’ work, Dr. Eliot demonstrates how a few, small biological differences at birth become exacerbated over time through socialization. Continue reading

Daddy-Daughters Weekend

21 Feb

This past weekend I went on my first solo trip to Chicago since having kids. Traveling alone for the first time in six years made coach feel like First Class! A little People magazine, a good book, a nap…It was glorious! And as it turns out, Dad and the daughters had a pretty glorious weekend too! Continue reading

The Birthday Dilemma

2 Feb

My five-year old was recently invited to her first girls only birthday party. It was a fairy themed party on a beautiful, warm Sunday, and everyone had a really nice time. The kids all got wings when they arrived and ran around outside in-between cake and craft projects. It was a sweet and wholesome party – but, half the class was excluded.

10 Reasons Girls & Boys Should Play Together

18 Jan

The following statement is neither profound nor surprising, but here it is anyway: Boys and girls don’t spend a whole lot of time with each other.

There’s no doubt that same-gender peer groups are great, but here are ten reasons why boys and girls would also benefit from playing TOGETHER. Continue reading

The Playdate

1 Dec

Why is it that “playdate” is not considered a compound word? My spelling skills happen to be atrocious (thank you spell-check for the assist with atrocious), so I typically don’t have a leg to stand on in these matters. But for some reason I feel strongly that playdate should be one word. This grammar/spelling conundrum is somewhat irrelevant, but I would like to share a tale about a playdate, and therefore am prefacing it by stating that I will henceforth intentionally ignore the annoying red squiggly lines. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: